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Welcome to The Rotary Club of Northbridge
Northbridge
We meet Tuesdays at 6:00 PM
Northbridge Golf Club
Sailors Bay Road,
Northbridge, NSW 2063
Australia
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Please send apologies to Helen Gulson before 10:30am each Monday at helen.gulson@ozemail.com.au
Club Service Duty Roster
Club Service Duty Roster
Speakers
Oct 27, 2020
Members Behind the Badge
Nov 03, 2020
Melbourne Cup
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Upcoming Events
Club Christmas Party
Dec 05, 2020
 
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The Rotary Club of Northbridge gratefully acknowledges the generous sponsorship of Northbridge Plaza
Birthdays & Anniversaries
Member Birthdays
Valda Andrews
October 1
 
Fay Petrou
October 4
 
John Weingarth
October 17
 
Ian Burnet
October 19
 
Masa Ohtani
October 19
 
Paul Sullivan
October 19
 
Liz Grey
October 25
 
Amy Brittain
October 31
 
Spouse Birthdays
Maree Rennie
October 2
 
Christine Altmeier
October 25
 
Join Date
Angie Fernandes
October 11, 2016
4 years
 
Liz Grey
October 29, 2002
18 years
 
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President's Message
Kevin Tattrie
member photo
Club Meeting News
 
Welcome:
 
President Kevin welcomed all members to the meeting and thanked our guest, Jane Lovett-Cameron, for coming again, and our guest speaker Steve Tucker.
 
Toast:
 
Bob Farrar gave a toast to the Rotary Club of Halifax Yorkshire United Kingdom which is where Bob came from.  The Club started in 1980.
 
Announcements:
 
Paul Sullivan advised that the Golf Day last Saturday was a great success and the Day made $3,500.00 net.  Paul thank all the volunteers on the day and particular thanked Peter McNair for donating his Rotary Hat.
Sally O’Neill thank everyone who had volunteered for the next Bunnings BBQ and she had a full schedule of names.
 
Save the Date
 
StreetWork’s annual fundraising event, the Glam & Grunge Night, is being held on Friday, 25 October. If you would like to attend, or for more information, contact Eleanor Chevor.
 
Guest Speaker
 
Peter Antaw introduced Steve Tucker on the subject of Ethics in Financial Services with Jon Gidney’ asking questions of Steve.
 
Jon Gidney’ advised that Steve as a degree in economics at Perth University and has been in wealth management for over 30 years becoming the CEO of MLC and NAB Private Wealth and JBWere in 2004 stepping down in 2013. Their combined revenues exceeding $1bn per annum and over 5000 staff.  Jon spoke about his long friendship with Steve.
Steve is a founding partner and chairman of Koda Capital and highly respected member of the Australian financial services. Steve is also involved with Ubus.
 
Jon asked Steve to talk about his early work with MLC.
 
Steve advised he started at the call centre in MLC in 1987 spoke about his role.  Steve went into business development (sales) and progressed through his career becoming CEO in 2004.
 
In 2006 Steve spoke at a meeting advising that the single most important need was for good financial advisers so not to have failures such as Storm Financial.  More consumer friendly instead of commission to sell products.  Steve spoke that there should be a fee for giving advice and the need to change the business model.  This talk was front page news in the Financial Review who stated the end of commissions which caused an uproar in the financial community.
Steve spoke about the Hayden Royal commission and of the clients that did not understand what they were getting involved with. There is too much bad banking and the need for professionally qualified advisers with ongoing education and resilience.
 
Steve also spoke regarding Great Financial Crash.  Advisers should take an oath regarding ethics.  To date 3500 signatures have taken the oath in 10 years.  There are 350000 financial advisers.
 
Jon asked Steve how do you promote ethics and Steve advised more of an understanding in relation to the needs of clients, more regulations, more courses, need to understand right from wrong, teams to go around to talk to executives and speak about ethics.
 
Jon advised many people can’t afford financial advice and should government pay.
Steve advised most deals are usually with wealthy people as normal cost for advice is $3500 and most people can’t afford it.  There needs to be low cost advice.
 
Banks are unwinding all their structure now in relation to commission.  New banks are coming up and are more competitive.  Social contact with the public important to the Banks.
 
Jon asked Steve did the new cultural happen at MLC.  Steve advised no change – wealth cultural different.  Financial advisers need financial degrees and on going training. Federal Government feels Bank lending regulations are too tight and are relaxing some of the requirements. 
 
Jon thanked Steve for his speech and gave him a bottle of 1989 Rotary White Burgundy wine.
Peter also thanked Steve and presented him with a certificate stating that on his behalf we have given 25 vaccines for polio.
 
Sergeant
 
Kim Wilkins conducted the Sargent sessions
World Polio Day - 24 October
 
Following John’s talk, President Kevin reminded us that World Polio Day is 24 October, and he showed a video of the current status of polio globally. The video spoke about the three types of polio, two of which have been eradicated. It was interesting to note that since the eradication program started in 1988 some 2.5 billion children have been immunized. Because of this, it is estimated some 18 million people can walk today  who otherwise would not have been able to, and 1.5 million child deaths have been prevented. Polio was declared eradicated in Africa on 25 August 2020 and only Afghanistan and Pakistan still have the wild polio virus affecting children.
 
 
A little bit of humour .....
 
 
                                                               
 
If anyone has any jokes or funny stories, feel free to send them to me for the humour section of the Bulletin! 
 
Stories
Northbridge Rotary Community Food Drive 2020
 
 
 
Saturday 26 September shone a bright light over Northbridge. From first light they came bearing gifts of love – by car and on foot, trailing children, dogs and each other. The blue uniformed brigade of Northbridge Rotary was there to meet them – about 40 in all, bright eyed and Covid safe. From early morning the first shift was beginning to receive and unload a continuous flow of non-perishable food supplies, making sure the donors went away with a smile. Northbridge Rotary’s Community Food Drive was in full swing.
 
By mid-morning, the alcoves and stairs of St. Marks Anglican Church Memorial Hall in Malacoota Road were bulging with rows of food boxes and packed shopping bags. The pace ebbed and flowed as people trailed in and out. When the two charity collection vans from Taldumande Youth Services and StreetWork had departed fully laden late that afternoon, there was still a supply of food remaining and Oz Harvest obliged with a collection of the remaining donations the following morning.
 
In all, it is estimated the Northbridge and North Shore community contributed to over a tonne of non-perishable food supplies that filled over 100 boxes and 50 shopping bags – enough for 2,400 meals or sufficient to feed a needy family of four for 18 months.
 
Liz de Rome, Taldumande’s Grants, Community and Volunteers Officer summed the impact of this event up perfectly:
“I wanted to share that as we dropped off bags and boxes of food to our young people, they were so grateful for their generous parcel. This morning, one young girl nearly cried (and me) as she couldn’t believe her luck. She wasn’t sure how she was going to make ends meet this week. The generosity of the community and Northbridge Rotarians has helped fill the pantries of our young people and they’re so grateful.”
 
The final comment belongs to the Northbridge Rotary event organiser, Eleanor Chevor: “What a day!”
 
Peter Russell
Publicity Officer
 
 
Rotary and its GPEI Partners Celebrate Eradication of Wild Polio in Africa
 
 
The World Health Organization (WHO) on 25 August announced that transmission of the wild poliovirus has officially been stopped in all 47 countries of its African region. This is a historic and vital step toward global eradication of polio, which is Rotary’s top priority.
 
After decades of hard won gains in the region, Rotary and its partners in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) — WHO, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, UNICEF, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Gavi, the vaccine alliance — are proclaiming the milestone an achievement in public health. They offer it as proof that strong commitment, coordination, and perseverance can rid the world of polio.
The certification that the African region is free of wild poliovirus comes after the independent Africa Regional Certification Commission (ARCC) conducted thorough field verifications that confirmed no new cases and analyzed documentation of polio surveillance, immunization, and laboratory capacity by Cameroon, Central African Republic, Nigeria, and South Sudan. The commission had already accepted the documentation of the other 43 countries in the region.
The last cases of polio caused by the wild virus in the African region were recorded in Nigeria’s northern state of Borno in August 2016, after two years with no cases. Conflict, along with challenges in reaching mobile populations, had hampered efforts to immunize children there.
 
Now that the African region is free of wild poliovirus, five of WHO’s six regions, representing more than 90 percent of the world’s population, are now free of the disease. Polio caused by the wild virus is still endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, in the WHO’s Eastern Mediterranean region.
 
The African region’s wild polio-free certification was celebrated during a livestream event. Speakers included Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, Bill Gates, Rotary International President Holger Knaack, Nigeria PolioPlus chair Dr. Tunji Funsho, and representatives of other GPEI partners. The celebration was followed by a press conference.
In the program, Knaack spoke about people needing good news during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. “The challenges ahead are formidable,” Knaack said. “That’s why we must recognize this great achievement and commend all the people who played important roles in reaching this milestone. It took tremendous effort over many years.”
 
An achievement decades in the making
Not detecting any wild poliovirus in Africa is in stark contrast to the situation in 1996, when 75,000 children there were paralyzed by the disease. That year, at a meeting of the Organization of African Unity in Cameroon, African heads of state committed to eradicating the disease from the continent.
To bolster the effort, also in 1996, Rotary, its GPEI partners, and South African President Nelson Mandela launched the Kick Polio Out of Africa campaign. Using soccer matches and celebrity endorsements, the campaign raised awareness of polio and helped more than 30 African countries to hold their first National Immunization Days. Mandela’s call to action helped mobilize leaders across the continent to increase their efforts to reach every child with polio vaccine.
 
 
Children in Cote d’Ivoire receive oral polio vaccines during an immunization campaign.
 
Since 1996, countless Rotary members from across Africa and around the world have raised funds, immunized children, and promoted vaccinations, enabling the GPEI to respond to and stop polio outbreaks. More than 9 billion doses of oral polio vaccine have been provided throughout the region, preventing an estimated 1.8 million cases of paralysis. Each year, about 2 million volunteers help vaccinate 220 million children against polio multiple times in the African region.
Rotary members have contributed nearly $890 million toward polio eradication efforts in the African region. The funds have allowed Rotary to issue PolioPlus grants to fund polio surveillance, transportation, awareness campaigns, and National Immunization Days.
Dr. Tunji Funsho, chair of Rotary’s Nigeria PolioPlus committee, noted Rotarians’ tremendous contributions to polio eradication efforts in Africa: “From raising funds and immunizing children, to providing ‘polio plusses,’ such as soap and health kits, Rotary members have shown resilience and steadfast dedication to our top priority of ending polio.”
Rotary members have helped build extensive polio infrastructure that has been used to respond to COVID-19 and, in 2014, the Ebola crisis, as well as to protect communities from yellow fever and bird flu.
Challenges still ahead
The GPEI’s challenge now is to eradicate wild poliovirus in the two countries where the disease has never been stopped: Afghanistan and Pakistan. Additionally, routine immunization in Africa must also be strengthened to keep the wild poliovirus from returning and to protect children against circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, which is rare but continues to infect people in parts of the African region.
To eradicate polio, multiple high-quality immunization campaigns must continue to be given priority. Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s necessary to keep children vaccinated against polio while also protecting health workers from COVID-19 and making sure they don’t contribute to its transmission.
Global health officials and experts say that sustained fundraising and advocacy are still crucial, not only to protect gains in Africa, but to reach the ultimate goal of a world without polio. Rotary members still have a critical role to play in keeping the African region free of wild poliovirus and eliminating the virus in the two countries where polio remains endemic.
As Knaack said, “This is a big step in our journey to a polio-free world, but the fight is not over yet. We still need the support of our Rotary members, donors, and heroic effort of health care workers to finish the job.”
Visit endpolio.org to learn more and donate.
 
Published by Rotary International. 25-Aug-2020
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Northbridge Rotary Provides Local and Overseas Disaster Assistance
Local and international humanitarian disasters have become the new norm and the Rotary Club of Northbridge has been involved in assisting wherever possible. Recently COVID-19 has received the bulk of media attention. Before that it was the eastern seaboard drought and bushfires. Then, in April, Cyclone Harold devastated parts of Vanuatu, Fiji and Tonga.
 
COVID-19 has considerably reduced Northbridge Rotary’s 2020 fundraising capability, including cancellation of its major fundraiser, the annual fireworks. Prior to this, the Club had raised $29,580 to aid those areas in NSW affected by the bushfires and drought.
 
With some of its remaining funds, the Club has committed $22,500 towards building a Community Pavilion at Kiah on the NSW south coast and repairing gardens around the Boomerang Centre in severely fire-damaged Mogo near Batemans Bay.
 
The Kiah Pavilion was completed 25th July and an official opening is planned for 8 August and we hope some members of Northbridge will be able to attend.
There is a story on the Rotary Club of Merimbula website if you would like to take a look please click on the link below.
 
 
 
Internationally, the Club has been asked to assist in the fight against COVID-19 by the Rotary Club of Kathmandu in Nepal.
Covid-19 cases have increased significantly in Nepal since late May with tens of thousands of migrant workers returning home from India and Nepal commencing a phased reopening in mid-June. 
 
With the assistance of other local Rotary Clubs, Northbridge Rotary has been able to donate $10,000 to help with the purchase of PPE equipment for medical staff, installing hand washing stations in strategic locations and supplying food for orphanages and others in need, as the photo(s)on this page illustrate.
 
Peter Russell
Publicity Director
    
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THE 4 - WAY TEST of the things we say or do

1). Is it the TRUTH?

2). Is it FAIR to all concerned?

3). Will it build GOODWILL & BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?

4). Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?